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Shop The Look: Dramatic, Bare-Faced Beauty

We couldn’t help but notice the barely-there, nude makeup trend du jour that seems to be making more and more appearances on the runways every season. Not only is it universally flattering, but it’s also much easier to achieve, especially with a few of our favorite picks below.

{Click on items to shop.}

Throwback Thursday: ‘Sleek Heat’

Taking a cue from our friends over at SideDish, each week we’ll bring you a glimpse back at D Magazine‘s most fashionable moments.

With the recent chill we’ve experienced the past few days, we felt it was only appropriate to bring you exotic and elaborate furs from our November 1981 issue. Furs that “cost more than a car.” Furs “our models neglected other appointments for to stay and model longer,” to be exact.

This six-page feature shows models wearing elaborate furs perfect for any occasion a fashionable Dallasite might find herself in:

Our winters may be mild, but there will be times–elegant evenings at the symphony, $1,000-a-plate Republican fund-raisers, debutante balls and extravagant dinners at Jean Claude–when nothing but a fur will do. Deliciously impractical, completely unessential.

Click on the images to enlarge and take a look back at Dallas’ fashion scene in 1981.
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Throwback Thursday: Suit Yourself

Taking a cue from our friends over at SideDish, each week we’ll bring you a glimpse back at D Magazine‘s most fashionable moments.

The fashion spread in the December 1986 issue of D Magazine is all about the guys. The feature highlights the fashion choices of five of the city’s most notable gentlemen at the time. The six-page piece features familiar faces, from Dean Fearing, then-executive chef at the Mansion on Turtle Creek, to Ed Budanauro, then-disc jockey and music director for KZPS-FM.

Writer Liz Logan explains the inspiration behind the spread:

These days, men who dress themselves are art increasingly widespread breed, and certainly, the fellows on the following pages don’t need anybody’s help to look, sharp. Each of our quintet of local hotshots manifests his passion for fashion differently, which isn’t surprising. The members of this Gang of Five range in age from twenty-three to forty and in profession from DJ to ad agency CEO. Still, the guys do have one thing in common: they’re aces at what they do, and they dress to fit the part.

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Olivia Palermo Unveils Clothing Line at NorthPark

Socialite Olivia Palermo has continually added to her fashion résumé since her days opposite Whitney Port on The City, MTV’s spinoff of reality show The Hills. In her new venture, Palermo, whose sculpted features have graced several magazine covers, has teamed up with Nordstrom’s in-house brand, Chelsea28, to design her own clothing line.

The collection, described as “modern staples with a high-fashion edge,” offers “modern feminine fashion at an accessible price level.” (Those prices range from $68 to $448.) Some items from the spring collection are currently available in stores and online, while others will be released periodically throughout the year. Palermo’s one-year partnership with Nordstrom will produce four collections. StyleSheet caught up with Palermo during her Feb. 12 appearance at NorthPark’s Nordstrom, where she discussed the transition from modeling to designing as well as her inspirations.

WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND YOUR CHELSEA28 COLLECTION WITH NORDSTROM?

It’s been a great collaboration. Nordstrom and I started talking about a year ago. They approached me, and it was about the right time to branch out and do a little bit of apparel. I’ve already been working very much in accessories and in beauty, so it’s a nice transition.

WHAT GOT YOU INTERESTED IN DESIGNING CLOTHES?

I thought it was a nice transition. The timelines for ready-to-wear beauty and accessories are a bit different, so it was nice to try that, work with different factories in different parts of the world. I was very hands-on through the whole process.

WHAT HAS THE TRANSITION BETWEEN MODELING CLOTHES AND DESIGNING THEM BEEN LIKE?

You know, it’s not so much a change, because everything that we do will be with OliviaPalermo.com. We do all the styling; we do all the production; we do all the creative; we pick the photographer; we pick hair and makeup, location …  So, for this, we kind of wanted to keep it very clean and stick to a studio shot. You know, just let the clothes speak for themselves for the first season. And then maybe move on in a different direction for the following season.

I NOTICED ON THE WEBSITE THAT YOU MODELED ALL THE CLOTHES IN YOUR COLLECTION. WAS THAT MORE USEFUL?

You know, I think it makes sense. It is my collection. How I wear it or one would wear it. I think it’s important to be supportive in your own clothes. Obviously, we have fit models for the product shots, but I think it is important [to model my own collection].

YOUR DESIGNS HAVE MANY EUROPEAN INFLUENCES. WHICH COUNTRY OR CITY’S FASHION DO YOU THINK IMPACTS YOUR STYLE THE MOST?

I think probably Paris, France. Through all of my travels, I get all of my inspirations all over the world, but this collection is really a foundation. You know, building a young girl’s wardrobe and starting with–I refer to them as lifer pieces–and then each season we do more statement pieces. So I think that bringing in the sporty element of denim and kind of elevating that, making it a bit more structured; adding a Breton stripe obviously keeps the Parisian feel. And I think the cuts and silhouettes are kind of for everyone’s body type, and that’s something that I took [into] consideration. Proportions are very important–I always say you need a good tailor. But we are women on the go, so I did find that a culotte can be very versatile. You can wear it with a pointy flat or you can wear it with a heel, and that makes it a bit easier.

The military jacket offers versatility as a vest or dress.
The military jacket offers versatility as a vest or dress.
WHICH ITEM IN YOUR COLLECTION DID YOU HAVE THE MOST FUN DESIGNING? 

I love the military jacket. Every girl loves a great military coat in their closet. And this was just adding the ability to make it into a vest or a dress if you want, or you can leave it open.

YOU’VE SAID THAT EVERY WOMAN HAS TO FIND HER OWN FASHION COMFORT ZONE FOR HERSELF. WHAT EXPERIENCES HELPED YOU FIGURE OUT YOUR OWN PERSONAL STYLE?

I think it takes time. You have to figure out what works for your body type, what doesn’t, what colors you like. Whether you prefer more of a structured feel or a loose feel. So you have to just play around with it. Take a few minutes; you can be in front of the mirror at home. And sometimes just playing with prints–you’d be pleasantly surprised.

Shop The Look: Southern Nonchalance Inspired by Billy Reid’s Fall 2016 Menswear Collection

So many of the collections at New York Fashion Week: Men’s exhibited simplicity and comfort, especially the drapey Fall layers seen at Billy Reid. Here we’ve selected a few essential menswear pieces that embody the Southern charm and rich fabrics similar to those seen on Reid’s runway last week. {Click on items below to shop.}

 

 

 

Billy Reid Fall 2016 backstage, photo by Kristi + Scot Redman.

Try This: The Perfect First-Date Look

With Valentine’s Day approaching, we started thinking about what to wear to impress, and emanate confidence, on a first date. Leading up to the date can be daunting enough, so take stressing over what to wear out of the equation. We asked stylist Carlos-Alonso Parada for his advice. For Carlos, the foundation of the perfect outfit lies with a nice top and jacket, paired with black or blue denim. Don’t be afraid to mix in prints, he advises. Accent the ensemble with a pair of high heels, and head out the door!

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Liz is wearing Givenchy tank, a Chloé animal print coat, and Dior earrings (all Forty Five Ten), a Brandy Pham needle ring (brandypham.com), Marc Cross bag (Forty Five Ten), and Joe Fresh black jeans.

Photographed by Kristi + Scot Redman. Styled by Carlos Alonso-Parada. On Set Management, Assistant Stylist: Gabe Ortiz. On Set Management, Beauty: Carmen Williamson. On Set Management, Model: Liz Standley. For more styling inspiration, follow us on Instagram: @dstylesheet.

Carlos Parada

See more from Carlos Alonso-Parada on Instagram: @wtfareuwearing or online.

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Throwback Thursday: The Dallas Look

Taking a cue from our friends over at SideDish, each week we’ll bring you a glimpse back at D Magazine‘s most fashionable moments.

It’s only fitting to kick off this series within the pages of D‘s March 1979 issue. Society was on the threshold of fashion’s most colorful and–dare we suggest–bold era: the 1980s. If you turn to Page 73 of the March 1979 issue of D Magazine, you’ll find dramatic poses, mirrored backdrops, and soft-hued pastels. “Intense colors” and “body-bearing” shapes also dominate this spread; silks and linens line the pages of this late ’70s tribute.

But we didn’t stop there. Keep flipping, and you’ll run into “Fresh Starts,” a feature in which we gave four staff members makeovers. The color spectrum ranges from “rosy plum blush” to “deep plum tones” within this feature. There are also several mentions of “body waves” – a distinct departure from the Brazilian blowouts of today.

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